Jenny Knipfer–Author

Best-selling Christian historical fiction author, Jenny Knipfer, shares her books, inspiration, thoughts on life and writing, and book reviews. Purchase Jenny's books, read her blog, or listen to encouraging podcasts, highlighting the life of a writer.

The Violets of March is the second book I’ve read by author, Sarah Jio. I really enjoyed this one as much as the last.

It was my pleasure to recently connect with Wisconsin author, Naomi Munch. I love meeting authors, especially ones from my home state.

This beautifully rendered, tragic tale steps out of the pages of little-known history to touch the hearts of readers with hope in the harshest of conditions and the inhumane cruelty of those in political control.

As a Coffee Pot Book Club tour host, I am happy to introduce Falling Pomegranate Seeds: All Manner of Things, Book #2, by Wendy J. Dunn. I throughly enjoyed this book!

I’ve stayed up reading the last few nights until 11:00, trying to make significant progress on All the Light We Cannot See. It has around 550 pages, a big commitment, but it has been on my list of books to read for some time.

I am thankful for entertaining books that hold my attention but also provide something a little meatier. With almost thirty books to her credit, Lynn Austin doesn’t disappoint. I’ve read many of her books over the years. I’ve found If I Were You to be one of her best.

This month I had planned to read some classic horror fiction titles, although horror isn’t my usual genre of interest, I do enjoy classic books. Dracula surprised me. It was not a God-less tale with nothing but gore and blood like I supposed.

Frankenstein surprised me with its deep thoughts about life and how much control we do or don’t have over it, and that our ability to create resembles only a mere shadow, compared to The Creator.

I absolutely loved Echo Among the Stones by fellow Wisconsin author, Jamie Jo Wright. It’s the perfect read for October, with its spooky overtures.

Based on true stories and told in a split timeline, The Girl Who Came Home is a poignant drama of things both lost and found.

%d bloggers like this: