Jenny Knipfer–Author

Historical fiction author, Jenny Knipfer, shares her books, inspiration, thoughts on life and writing, and book reviews. Purchase Jenny's books, read her blog, or listen to encouraging podcasts, highlighting the life of a writer.

I have been enjoying the living color of the wildflowers blooming in a strip that my husband, Ken, planted alongside the tall grass at the base of the hill on the north side of our home. We look each day for new blooms as we go slowly along the strip on our golf cart with little Miss Ruby (our mini Yorkie) standing at the read to chase any wildlife that might make itself know. An array of colors from pastels to deep fuchsia and red brighten the hillside with the cheery faces of flowers.

Color for Me Please:

Life is so much better in color isn’t it? Not that I don’t appreciate the depth of a black and white photo and the lines, shades, and shadows defining the subject captured within. But color makes me happy. I don’t think I could live in a house with all white walls and ceilings. Ick.

My home hosts various shades of gray, warm golds, cool blues, and dusty greens on its walls and trim. My creative space showcases colorful fabric, yarn, beads, and books arranged according to similar palettes. Turquoise blue and butter yellow accents tie the decor together with the blue-gray walls and gray and white flowered curtains.

Color inspires, calms, and uplifts me. I can’t imagine my world with it.

How I Build Color Into My Books:

I like to be as descriptive as possible when writing about the setting in my work. Color plays a big role in that. Imagine amber eyes, molasses-colored hair, and the gray, smokey orange dawn of a morning overshadowed by the aftermath of war.

In Ruby Moon red plays a role of triggering Jenay to feel guilty. It speaks of passion and loss but also growth. Jenay’s aunt spins an Ojibwe tale about a red moon that Jenay comes to realize has taken place in her own life.

Blue Moon doesn’t really pertain to the color blue as much as what a “blue moon” represents. Think of the statement “true blue”. It signifies something real, loyal, and lasting. In Blue Moon these qualities translate into the story, and in a way blue comes to color the theme of the book and all the drama eventually leads to peace.

In Silver Moon the image of the moon in the sky ties the characters together and gives a feeling of space and scope beyond the reality they face. I use a tale told by my favorite character, Maang-ikwe, to tie in the image of the Silver Moon to the story.

How Do You Add Color?

Tell me how you add color to your home, day, work, or hobbies. Or maybe you enjoy the cleanness of a white palette. Comment and share your thoughts.

Thanks for reading!

As always, thank you for spending a portion of your day with me! Blessings, J

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